Explaining what shouldn’t need explaining
Tree Davis Leader To Move On

The Village Feast returns in-person Oct. 16

Aug. 31 deadline for discount tickets

Village Feast 2019_Ashley Muir Bruhn-58
Patrons enjoy The Village Feast in 2019. This year's event will be offered simultaneously at two locations: Mulvaney's B&L in Sacramento, and Great Bear Vineyards in Davis. (Ashley Muir Bruin/Courtesy photo)

(From press release) Annually, The Village Feast celebrates the Sacramento region’s Farm-to-Fork season, where the community gathers to enjoy and honor the bounty of local farmers. After two years as an online event, it returns to its origin as a shared, in-person community experience – this year at two regional venues.

The two simultaneous events will be from noon to 3 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 16 at:

  • Great Bear Vineyards, 24800 County Road 101A, Davis, catered by The Buckhorn, and
  • Mulvaney's B&L, 1215 19th St., Sacramento

Presented by Davis Farm to School and the Les Dames d’Escoffier International, Sacramento, The Village Feast is a fundraiser for food and agricultural education in the greater Sacramento area. The Village Feast follows the late-summer feasts of Provence, France, in the Provençal grand aïoli tradition, uniting people and food for a long, leisurely alfresco meal that stars aïoli — a golden garlic-mayonnaise. All proceeds from The Village Feast support early and continued education around food and agriculture.

As in years past, each meal begins with appetizers of olives, nuts, local wines and fresh baguettes. The meal is served family-style, with passed platters of heirloom tomatoes drizzled with local olive oil, steamed and grilled local vegetables, hard-boiled eggs, and bowls of garlic-scented aïoli. Next comes the grilled lamb and summer white bean salad, then a fruit galette for dessert.

Les Dames d’Escoffier and Davis Farm to School paired up for this event because of their shared visions and values. Les Dames d’Escoffier, a philanthropic organization of female leaders in the areas of food, fine beverage and hospitality, gives scholarships to area women to further their education in these areas. Davis Farm to School provides garden grants, organizes farm field trips, and supports farm-fresh food in school meals.

Tickets are $150 per person through Aug. 31, and $165 after that, until sold out. Attendees may reserve full tables of eight for $1,200 through Aug. 31, and $1,320 after. Tickets are available at thevillagefeast.com.

The silent auction will be online, available for anyone to participate between Oct. 2 and 16. It includes dozens of items and experiences donated by chefs, restaurants, wineries and community members. Participants bid on items by downloading the free Auctria smartphone app at https://www.auctria.com/blog/auctria-mobile-app/, and pre-registering.

For more information about The Village Feast, email Meghan Russell at info@davisfarmtoschool.org or Rachael Levine at rachaellevine@hotmail.com.

Comments

Alan C. Miller

Hi folks. This is an event announcement, not a commentary or article, so please keep comments to a minimum. This isn’t the place to debate topics. --Maud R. Ateher

Roberta L. Millstein

For those not following along: Alan is making a reference to a policy on another blog and thus trying to make a point here in a humorous way. So to clarify, all on-topic comments that satisfy our comment policy are welcome on this post; they may or may not get a reply from the organization who made this post, however.

Keith

"--Maud R. Ateher"

LOL, this is why the Davisite comment section is so much more interesting and fun than the Vanguard. Keep em coming Alan. The Davisite's gain is the Vanguard's loss.

Alan C. Miller

Yes, Roberta, Alan made a funny.

Strange thing, Maud D. Vanguard never seemed to appreciate a Sahara-dry sense of humor. Seemed to think he was lost in a rain forest despite clear in-FACE evidence of a complete lack of trees.

Todd Edelman

This abuse of language, this example of fakequity... should receive some kind of disclaimer even if it's only a press release.

The organizers are clearly competent and the activities of the beneficiaries are unassailable.

BUT

The use of "community gathers" is Holiday-Tree-Stupid*. OBVIOUSLY many or most people in Davis cannot afford $150 per person for a gourmet and social dining experience like this (outdoors, hope there's no nearby wildfire that day).

Obviously in a better world the relative elites who represent the "community" at this event would push hard to fully fund the target organizations so that holding this event is unnecessary. But that would not give them a place to meet (and potentially fornicate with other elites as a way to perpetuate their dynasties). It goes without saying that they would not have this event be open to actual community, with e.g optional donations (pay what you can). I assume that poor people can attend as volunteers or performers.

I am SO happy that this is not taking place in Central Park, as it has in the past. Why does not Davis itself host a similarly-themed event that's open to the actual public?

* Refers to the City of Davis - in some kind of amateur attempt at being equitable - describing the traditional pagan tree-sacrifice for the nominally Christian Christmas holiday as a "Holiday Tree" even virtually every related event is Christmas-themed...

Alan C. Miller

" . . . that would not give them a place to meet (and potentially fornicate with other elites as a way to perpetuate their dynasties) . . . I assume that poor people can attend as volunteers or performers."

T.E., when I actually understand your words, you are a political comedy treasure for Davis.

Roberta earlier explained the comedy in the first comment here (mine). Care to take a stab at explaining T.E.'s entire routine here to the good folks reading the Davisite? ;-)

Roberta L. Millstein

Something about the irony of the "village" feasting when in fact it's just the elite feasting, even if for good causes... what happens after the elite feast is, I guess, a private matter.

Ron O

If you paid me $150 to attend the event, I'd still have to think about it.

I guess I'm not much of a "social" person, as I kind of dread these types of events - regardless of the cause.

I agree with Todd - if you want to support a cause, you can do it without being served "heirloom tomatoes drizzled with local olive oil, steamed and grilled local vegetables, hard-boiled eggs, and bowls of garlic-scented aïoli. Next comes the grilled lamb and summer white bean salad, then a fruit galette for dessert."

Even if it benefits "Les Dames d’Escoffier, a philanthropic organization of female leaders in the areas of food, fine beverage and hospitality, gives scholarships to area women to further their education in these areas."

Is there a "shortage" of women attending college, these days? Homey don't think so. Men are in the minority, there.

Hell, the federal government just forgave $10-$20K in regard to student loans, anyway.

Bah, humbug. And get off my lawn.

Todd Edelman

Regarding my "... entire routine...", I assume that this means an obituary?

Alan C. Miller

That was rhetorical, Roberta, but thanks for taking a stab at it . . . ;-)

Alan C. Miller

I had been to the event once about three years ago in Central Park, but had no idea the cost. I would have guessed $40. I must have had a scholarship or volunteered at booth as the hired help or something, because I would have remembered $150. The irony T.E. observes is quite valid. The event was quite crowded, and I'm amazed that many people in Davis could have afforded (or chosen to afford) such a pricey village feast. The fine wine and fine food crowd is definitely not my wheelhouse. Whatever a wheelhouse is.

Roberta L. Millstein

Alan, I thought so, but I wasn’t sure, so I decided to err on the side of caution.

Doug

Thank you, Alan, for confessing your ignorance of what a "wheelhouse" is. You could look it up.
Ron, I was once given a free ticket to a past Village Feast, and I had a wonderful time. That's me; I'm pretty social (and socialized), and appreciative that some people can make a living in "food, fine beverage, and hospitality." And yes, there very much is a need (IMO) to encourage women to become involved in those fields, unless you're good with the idea of them continuing to be excluded.
I am not offended by elite organizations wanting to use the image of a village, although there's a bit of an egalitarian aura surrounding the word. That's all it is, though, as there were historical villages that had big disparities of income and status.
I certainly understand that poor people will largely be absent from this event. I would point out that there are plenty of events, even in Yolo County, that are more expensive and exclusive. I hope for Todd's sake that they don't distribute press releases to The Davisite, so as to spare his sensibilities.

Ron O

Doug: I'm blaming Alan and Todd for getting this started.

As such, I'm taking no responsibility for my own comment, either.

:-)

Truth be told, there's usually no comments at all regarding articles such as this. So, maybe we're bringing positive attention to it?

That's my spin, at least.

But in regard to women "being excluded" in these fields, I've seen no evidence of that. And obviously, I would not be "good" with that - as you imply, regardless. (I don't mind that rejoinder, given my own comment.)

Again, though - men are generally in the minority in universities. (Probably not in traditionally "male" courses of study, such as engineering and computer science.)

But yeah, the comments became kind of negative (even if amusing), and I'm not surprised that someone challenged that.

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